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unpredictable world. >> join us... >> join us... >> as we discuss... >> today's most critical global issues. >> join us... >> join us... >> join us... >> join us... >> for great decisions. >> prepare... >> prepare... >> prepare to discuss >> prepare... >> prepare to discuss the world! [instrumental music] >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. great decisions is produced in association with the university of delaware. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by, price waterhouse coopers llp, the aarp office of international affairs, and the european commission. coming up next, "should america and the european commission. coming up next, "should america give up on haiti?" [instrumental music] >> welcome to great decisions, where americans make tough choices on u.s. foreign policy. i'm ralph begleiter. this week we ask, "should the u.s. give up on haiti?" to help answer this question we'll be joined by great decision participants in dallas and by our experts: ray walser, a senior policy analyst at the heritage fou
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
dan balz, thank you for helping us remember him. you can join us again next sunday morning for another critical look at theedia. "state of the union with candy crowley" begins right now. candy will have an update on japan, the japanese ambassador to the united states will be among her guests. >>> the known death toll in japan's earthquake tsunami disaster is now over 1,200. the government official believes more than 10,000 people may have died in one region alone. and this morning, the possibility of meltdowns in two nuclear reactors. the japanese government believes there could be a second hydrogen explosion similar to one yesterday building another housing reactor. 200,000 people have been evacuated. at least nine tested positive and health authorities are already distributing iodine tablets as an antidote to radiation. public broadcasting in japan told evacuees to close doors and windows, put a wet towel over their nose and mouth and cover up. this morning the prime minister announced rolling power outages throughout the country and called this japan's most difficult mom
is on the way from the u.s. and other countries. with so many roads damaged, the challenge will be getting all of that aid to the people who need it. more than 200 aftershocks have jolted japan since the quake hit, and some of them quite powerful. several happened near a nuclear plant where one reactor has been overheating since friday's earthquake. >> officials say an explosion there involved an outer building, not any of the reactors. people living within 12 miles of the plant have been told to evacuate. before nightfall, more than 3,000 people were rescued across the country. the death toll has topped 900. and officials now fear it could grow higher. we're getting new video in from japan and it really is something to watch. take a look. >> ireporter aaron sent this to us. he was attending a college graduation at a theater in tokyo when the earthquake hit. the theater roof collapsed, but aaron and many others were able to get out, and we hope to talk to aaron lace live as soon as we're able to get a connection with him. so stay with us for his story to match some of those remarkable images.
likely caused bay mixture of hydrogen and oxygen used to cool down the fuel rods with seawater. 600 residents still in the area being told to stay indoors after 160 people may have been ex-prosed to radiation after the last blast. the editor for the japanese online edition of the "wall street journal" is joining us. we were talking about the fact that they have been having the rolling blackouts and that is making things consist all the way around. >> they were pep co which is the company that operates the nuclear reactors shut down also provides electricity to tokyo. there is not enough electionity to go around because of the shut down and so they are going to do the step-by-step stopping electricity at one part of tokyo while the others go on. the whole thing was not handled well and as of now the stoppage has not taken place at all. >> so people are sitting there waiting for the electricity to go off on on at any minute. is that what the situation is. >> woo hwe were told to go to e home page to find out what time our area would be fit. as of this morning while we were wondering t
arriving in tokyo within the past 24 or so is martin savidge. he's joining us now by phone. last time john spoke with you, you were trying to make your way from tokyo on a flight to get somewhere north of there. how are you doing? where are you? >> well, you know what, we're still trying to do the same thing, fred. we've just gotten into vans and we're going to make our way to the domestic airport. and it is hoped from there that we catch a plight in about maybe two hours. this will be a domestic flight that might take us db leapfrog us 150, 200 miles north. as you know the roads and of course the rail system is out up in that region. so what we're trying to do is fly as far as we can north and we still know we're eventually going to have to go on road and probably take hours after that point. so that's the point. right now, though, as you said, it is very early in the morning here in japan and it is going to be a critical day of the rescue effort really being ramped up. it ramped up yesterday and it will be more so today as they continue to flpluck them from t rooftops. two natural disast
like from what i've seen before look like pieces of a cruise missile. it's hard for us to confirm exactly what sort of weapon or missile this might be. it's also hard for us to confirm anything that we're being told about what this building was being used for. certainly the people we're with here have just gone inside the building. this lady pulling out more bits of debris. what she's saying is look at this. for them this is proof this building was struck by some kind of a missile. okay. this is still warm. and the writing on it says this equipment contains parts and assemblies sensitive to damage by discharge precaution when using and over here it's hard to read it looks like a serial number on the other side. let's have a look over here. hard to know exactly what it is. being shown something else over here. heavy part of something. this is what people here are telling us, showing us is part of a missile system. let me have a look at this. this is from the outside. certainly seen a few cruise missiles before. certainly it has the look of a weapon of a missile about it. again, can
[ gunfire ] >>> when the u.s. bombed libya, the first retaliation unfolded on our newscast. explosions and heavy gunfire lighting up the night sky like fireworks. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com circumstance success >>> and from war to fear. misery and also miracles. nine days buried beneath the rubble in japan, rescued alive. >>> and a story here in the united states that certainly deserves your attention tonight. [ gunfire ] >> boy, look at that. how a frightening hostage situation ends when the s.w.a.t. team opens fire. hello, everyone. i'm don lemon. thanks for joining us. we start tonight. this is tripoli just a short time ago. take a look. [ gunfire ] >> loud explosions ring out in libya's capital city. it is midnight right now in that country and in the midst of all this unrest this is what libya's state-run government broadcasting is running right now. it's a tale of two very different realities. we'll show you that in a moment. as we go on air, the libyan army is announcing a second cease-fire, yet moammar gadhafi's group is blasting fire into the night skiet
housing the u.s. mission to the united nations. the ronald h. brown building was commerce secretary during clinton's first term in office. >>> the shuttle "endeavour" arrives in the space shuttle tonight. it's set to lift off for the final space mission. it's time to continue to suzanne malveaux. i'll be over to talk about the obama doctrine. >>> live from studio 7, i'm suzanne malveaux. want to get you up to speed. i want to go directly to ras lanouf. what is the latest over there? >> hi, suzanne, well, for the last hour and a half, we've been hearing and seeing a fairly heavy artillery barrage. we've been hearing the explosions taking place on the other side of ras lanouf. they are trading artillery with gadhafi's military. this is a blow to the opposition that has been forced back from its positions in ben jawad, 40 miles to the west of here. they came under heavy sustained artillery, tank and rocket fire, as well as snipers inside that town firing on them. they were unable to sustain that, stand up against it. we saw them beating a hastety retreat from ben jawad coming here to r
pitch black. there are a lot of streets with all sorts of debris. us a move closer to the north you can see where the water may have been two or three inches and became four or five or six feet. one car was literally spiked into a fence as if it was skewered. we haven't been up in this region in the daylight. >> kelly: based on what you've seen and what you just described as getting cold and weather getting very cold right now, one thing comes to mind. fear and panic. how will the people avoid that. are they getting help to avoid that? >> reporter: they are but it's tough to get around to the people. you don't know about the fear and panic because you can't get to them physically. it's important to get search and rescuers to them tomorrow. >> kelly: that is adam housley laying it out in what the people are facing. >> jamie: and it's a scramble as they try to deal with the damaged nuclear power plants, the government is declaring a state of atomic power emergency. it's asking russia to raise energy sfleismt was the scene at one of the country's major refineries, up in flames. the prime m
the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which is a key city two hours east of tripoli, people are saying that civilians are still being massacre
catastrophe in japan. i'm wolf blitzer. john vos is joining us over in the cnn center in atlanta. a lot of news to cover. let me give our viewers the highlights of what's going on right now. it's now just after 7:00 a.m. saturday in japan. survivors of the strongest earthquake recorded in that country's history are seeing the enormous destruction in the harsh light of day, and they are still being shaken to the core. two powerful new tremors measuring higher than a magnitude of 6 struck within the last hour alone, after the 8.9 monster quake hit japan friday afternoon unleashing a huge tsunami. japanese media reporting that the death toll could be higher than 1,000. hundreds of people may be missing. some may be trapped alive or buried in homes that were simply washed away. the tsunami sent water rushing sever six miles inland. one area of deep concern right now. japanese authorities are trying to cool down the temperature inside a nuclear power plant rattled by the quake. president obama says the united states is helping to monitor the plant for possible radiation leaks. he also sent h
of fighting government rebels after the u.n.-approved use of force in a no-fly zone in an effort to protect civilians on the ground from moammar qaddafi's forces. qaddafi warned hell would await anyone that attacked his country. >> we'll answer them. our response will make their lives hell as well as they are making our lives well. they will never enjoy peace because this is injustice. martha: i'm martha mccallum. rick: i'm rick folbaum. >> this resolution should send a strong message to colonel qaddafi and his regime that the violence must stop, the killing must stop and the people of libya mist be protected and have the opportunity to express themselves freely. qaddafi has lost his legitimacy. there is no justification for his leadership now that he perpetrated violence against his own people. rick: this is video of an air strike against a rebel camp near benghazi. martha: david, what specifically does this resolution authorize? report it imposes a no supply zone over libya. it says all libyan flights. but if you look at the language of this resolution it's much broader. it says all neces
for joining us this morning. >> sandra shaw has a check on the forecast. happy st. patrick's day. >> we have spring beginning this weekend. it is march madness and st. patrick's day all in one. let's check the temperatures. not bad. a good start. 48 downtown. 41 at the airport. we're in the low to mid 40's on the eastern shore. plenty of sunshine today and about 10 degrees above normal, 62 to 66 degrees with light wind at 5 to 10 miles per hour. it will be warmer as we head to the end of the workweek and tomorrow. >> nice ride on the major roads. loch raven, we have an accident in parkville. not indicating a whole lot in the way of delays as far as speed sensors. 50 miles per hour on the west side just past 795. o'donnell street was shot down near potomac for the st. patrick's day parade. the closures go into effect at 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 a.m. on saturday. central avenue and river club drive in edgewater, another accident. 95 and the beltway, great times. this is liberty. building volume but still moving at a pretty good clip. this is traffic at the key bridge on the east side of the beltwa
, and the west coast. it appears the u.s. has escaped significant damage. we'll check in with meteorologist jeff ranieri in san francisco in a moment. first, joining me on the phone from tokyo is our producer, arata yamamoto. hello, arata. >> reporter: hi. >> there have been more than 100 aftershocks of a magnitude of five or greater, i believe. are you feeling these? >> reporter: some of them. not all. i am 188 miles south of the epicenter. ones i feel here are not as many as that. >> and are you seeing any further signs of damage where you are? >> reporter: not here in tokyo. i think the damage that was caused in tokyo, we heard reports of a walkway collapsing and we have reports of death here but that was from the first earthquake, not from the following aftershock. >> i believe the road system, as well, has been damaged in tokyoingtokyo i , a number of high ways closed, correct? >> reporter: the roads are closed. and what's compounded that is the fact that up until around midnight most of the train system was shut down which meant that everyone, people working in tokyo on a friday, busy frid
at three mile island gave us the assurance that we were getting fact that is we needed in order to make key decisions. i don't care how good a decision-maker you are. if you don't have the right facts it's not going to prevail. >> sir, when you would -- as you're watching this, what is the advice that you would want to impart to japanese officials that are now having to assess this disaster? >> probably the key thing is just to keep pushing and in effect cross examining every possible source in order to get a reliable set of facts you can use to make decisions. there are involved technical questions here that you require the need of experts and obviously they have flooded the area with all kinds of expertise and advice. but it's when it comes to making difficult decisions like i'm sure the decision to evacuate was you've got to be sure that you've got a firm grip on precisely what's going on. >> for a lot of people watching this, they are reminded that there are 104 nuclear power plants in america. does the situation in japan change your perspective at all about nuclear energy and its uses
. >>> the u.s. government is trying to get americans out of japan. charlieey. >> are -- charley. >> flights are being chartered out of japan. nearly officials say more -- official say 450,000 people are in shelters and supplies are running low. more than 5,000 people are believed dead and officials believe the total will climb more than 10,000. >>> look at the video showing the tsunami wave crashing through the store's entrance early in the morning. the water knocked down clothing racks and left clothes and other merchandise washed-up in the nearby parking lot. seven waves wrenched the store during the span of 3 1/2 hours. the store opened in september and the owners are vowing to rebuild and reopen. >>> and stay with abc2news.com. our special section on crisis in japan is full the latest news, pictures and videos. find that under the spotlight section on the home page. >>> today, the usns comfort is shipping out. it went to haiti last year to help after the earthquake and now it's headed south again. linda so joins us live at the canton pier with more on the mission. linda. >> reporter: go
're following right now. the japanese ambassador to the united states. he is here with us. you heard the story. let me repeat it, mr. ambassador, because i know you speak for the japanese government. a meltdown may be under way at one of fukushima's daiichi nuclear power reactors. an official with japan's nuclear and industrial safety agency told cnn. quhak you tell us about this, mr. ambassador? >> chief cabinet secretary of japan has made an announcement in the press conference about this issue. there was a concern about this reactor. we have confirmed that there was a blow-up. it was not a blow-up of reactor, nor container. it was a blow-up of the outer building. so there was no leakage of radioactive material. we are now trying to cope with the situation by putting water into that -- >> saltwater. >> yeah, saltwater into the reactor and there are some other issues with other reactors as well. which needs also an injection of water or taking up vapor, because of increasing pressure into the container. and we're now working on it. >> but is it fair to say, mr. ambassador, that a meltdown may
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
. >> for all of us here, thanks for watching. >>> tonight on "world news," surviving cancer. the number soars. now 1 in 20 americans. tracking the progress and the new help for patients and families. >>> muslims under fire. a muslim congressman chokes back tears at a heated hearing on homegrown terror. >>> rising danger. severe damage has flooding spreading and powerful storms sending rivers over their banks. our reporter on the scene with even more heavy rain on the way. >>> and, made in america. the newest challenge in the middle of grand central station. and an even bigger reveal. the new jobs being sown in the u.s. right now. >>> good evening. not long ago, a cancer diagnosis felt like a death sentence. not anymore. huge numbers of americans, hundreds of thousands more each year, are surviving and living with cancer. numbers just released from the centers for disease control show that 1 in 20 american adults is now a cancer survivor, almost 12 million of us. we are catching cancer earlier and treating it more effectively. and ron claiborne is here with what it all means for the survivors
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
you for watching us. every moment you can not miss. >> steve: we do know that three of us will be back tomorrow on tuesday and we hope to see you then. >> brian: bye, everybody. bill: all right, thank you guys. good morning, everybody! first up today, breaking news out of japan, a possible setback at the nuclear plant, and we have new images of smoke rising from at least one, maybe two, of the six reactors. those brave japanese workers, now being evacuated yet again, efforts to cool the overheating reactor are on hold. the crisis to preventing possible meltdown not over just yet. we'll have the latest from japan in a matter of moments here. >>> in the meantime, another fox news alert, allied forces striking libya again. this is overnight videotape from the u.s. navy, a u.s. coalition launching two nights of punishing air attacks targeting mommar gadhafi's forces, b52 bombers, jet fighters, more than 120 tom hawk cruise missiles, scattering progovernment forces on the ground in libya, the long time leader vowing a long war ahead. good morning, everybody. we've got it all covered for you
as u.s. and european countries continue pounding targets across -- targets across lib yeah. linda so is standing -- libya. linda so is standing by with the latest. >> reporter: he is vowing to fight long war but there's a strong message that he is not safe. u.s. and allied forces struck his compound just yards from his tent. the u.s. says he was not a target but the goal was to take out his military capabilities. it's unclear where he was during the attack. this is the second day of air strikes. international force pound the targets with cruise missiles stealth bombers and fighter jets. the u.s. says a no-fly zone is in place and will hand over control of the military operation to a european or nato led coalition in days. >> we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition. we will have a military role in the coalition. but we will not have the preeminent role. >> reporter: a u.s. official says he is not sure how long this military effort in libya will last or if qaddafi will step down. if you go to abc2news.com, we have posted the latest on the main pa
filed charges in this bizarre case. abc2 news, jamie costello joins us with the very latest. jamie. >> police arrested and charged 23-year-old gordon jenkins with attempted murder. he is charged with arson, attempted murder, and assault. police were called near north point where they found the 47- year-old teresa hamel outside badly burned. her son entered the room and started choking her. she managed to get out of the house. hamel is in critical, but stable condition right now at hopkins bayview. no bail has been set. jamie costello, abc2 news. >>> thanks a lot, jamie. >>> a carol county woman is calling on police to file charges, claiming a bully assaulted her son on the school bus. abc2 news, jeff hager joins us now with more on the allegations being raised. jeff. >> west newman, it's what happened on the bus that finds his mother seeking justice now. a fourth grader on that bus allegedly grabbed wes from behind when he was taunting another child, playing keep away, and choked the second grader to the point where he couldn't breathe. the school nurse wrote a report, but the sc
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
to be fixed. >> we would love for you to weigh in about the story in our blogs. thanks for being with us. we will back here bright and early tomorrow morning at 6:00 a.m. eastern. >> "cnn newsroom" is live now with carol costello. >> did you guys go to an ivy league school? >> oh, no! >> university of maryland all the way. sorry about the ncaa tournament. >> i didn't either and we are doing just fine. i'm carol costello sitting in for kyra phillips. workers pulled after a spike in radioactive levels. 50 miles from the plant traces of radiation are turning up in city tap water. authorities in fukushimasy say the amounts found yesterday morning were not harm phil and not detectible later in the day. for the first time in japan's history an emperor gone on television to address a national crisis. the emperor akihito told the japanese people not to lose hope three reactors damaged at the plants. this is a view up above. that is reactor three on the left-hand side of your screen and reactor four in the middle. if you can determine that. radiation levels surged after that white cloud of smoke was
increase the budget and put us on all the ideas. if we for example -- there are so many assumptions, and very different figures but if we saw an economic growth that we want, if we saw as afghanistan, having 52% with defense spending be pretty you would see us get to that level. .. >> what would be the consequences of failing to increase the defense budget by in real terms some noticeable amount from 2015? >> if we wanted the rate of real terms increase will determine how quickly we can get to the benchmarks that we have set out for 2020. if it is a steep increase, we will reach that point earlier. >> what do you mean by steep? let's say 3% real terms increase pay year? >> well, that would be very nice. [laughter] >> and, of course, that -- it also depends on the decisions that we take in the early years as to where we are on the carbon as to the upswing of that. they are all dependent on, if, for example, we were to take steeper savings in the early year, it requires a sharper upswing in the late years to get to the same point. the rate -- the actual number of the real terms growth
is the justification for continued u.s. taxpayer investment? in egypt and elsewhere, successive u.s. administrations failed to move beyond the status quo and prepare for the future. we should not associate the protests in jordan and bahrain events transpire in other places. we have failed to effectively use our resources to help build strong accountable institutions that protect basic human rights. this administration's crier decision to cut support from pro-democracy civil groups in egypt and the only fund groups seceded with the mubarak government is a mistake and it must never repeat. then the mistake of the bush administration and continued and that the country -- under the current administration, to get new business with the libyan regime. john's wife, victoria, my constituent, and others are in the audience today. madam secretary, i have a letter that they have written requesting yours and director miller's help in securing information about the role of gaddafi in the 1980's and 1990. some of us objected to the normalization of relations with the libyan regime. this is proof that the oppressor
about radiation poisoning as well. >> dave: thanks for being with us for 8 hours this weekend, log onto foxandfriends.com for the "after the show" show, back at 6:00 a.m., tomorrow, for 6:00 a.m., tomorrow, for continuing coverage. captioning by, closed captioning services, inc. >> eric: a "fox news alert," could japan be teetering on the edge of a nuclear disaster, reeling from the devastating earthquake and tsunami? the nuclear concerns are bringing new worries, this morning that the crisis in the country could get worse and there could be another big earthquake. hello, i'm eric sean, on this busy sunday morning. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby. japan's prime minister is now calling the crisis there, one of the worst since the endf world war ii. they are worried about possible melt downs and potential for an explosion at nuclear reactors, along the northeast earn coast. and, more than 170,000 people evacuating the area, where authorities fear now more than 10,000 people have already died from the quake and a wall of water that rushed right through. david piper on the ground, streaming live
agency. he joins us live from tokyo. what is the status of that system? >> reporter: we are really getting into unchartered territory here. the government called it a nuclear state of emergency. look at the chronology. we had the massive quake yesterday. then it shut down as they normally do in a situation like that. then it xexasperated it. the steam was coming off earlier. some radioactivity material was released with the steam. first it was a mile, then it was stretched to 10 kilometers. now it's doubled. they are talking 12 miles, 20 kilometers. this has continued to grow throughout the day. this nuclear radioactive material is detected in the area. some indication there may be melting down of fuel inside there. then the explosion. the explosion happened a few hours ago. four people were injured in that. we are waiting to hear what the extent of those injuries would be. then pushed 12 miles. also the defense to go in and ail the elderly people from the area away. the government had been saying the risk from the radioactivity is small but if you hear from various analysts, it do
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
, evacuations were ordered for cities up and down the west coast. joining us by phone freelance reporter gavin blair. this is a massive quake. these images are frightening. tell us what happened. >> reporter: it was about 2:45 friday afternoon, the quake started, as many quakes that do hit japan started, didn't seem anything out of the ordinary. the situation became more violent. and the sways were going on longer and it became clear it was not a regular quake like the kind we experience a few times a month. >> sean: as we look at these images and the reports and stories and the tsunami that follows, you see this is it like we you in the middle of this feeling this? >> reporter: i was 300 terse, 200 miles away. i've been in japan -- 14 years and i've never experienced anything like this earthquakes are not unusual, but this was really different. people here are will drilled. it was different. people were diving under tables, getting into doorways and small rooms. it was terrifying. >> sean: even the aftershocks were powerful. >> reporter: they were going on through the night. i couldn't get ho
the loss of someone so young questions as well. cheryl connor join us live from police headquarters do. we know where he got the gun? >> reporter: yeah. i tell you that is one question that police are still trying to track down. what i can say tonight, we now the name of the young victim, tyshon townsend. the shooting was an accident and neighbors say the mother was terrified. detectives swarmed the home in the 3600 block of fern hill avenue after a gun goes off in a 4-year-old boy falls down. >> i heard the gun shot. that is when i heard the woman scream in pain with -- she was really crying, screaming. >> reporter: neighbors say the mom was beside herself as he was taken to the hospital where he died. police say the boy accidentally shot himself in the face. valerie doesn't want to appear on camera but shared memories of the victim and his brother playing with her grandson a few days ago. >> they were playful and happy and having a good time. there wasn't -- they were well mannered. >> reporter: she had never seen the mom and her boys before that. she thinks they were visiting the home
. this morning, target libya. u.s. and european forces pound libya overnight. taking out key targets at the u.s. gets embroiled in a new overseas conflict. now moammar gadhafi is surrounding key sites with women and children to create a human shield. how involved will the u.s. get? >>> hope and fear. nine days after the tsunami, an incredible rescue. an 80-year-old woman and a teenage boy found alive. but then, there's this. the drinking water in tokyo, now tainted with radiation. >>> fall from grace. he was the most famous bear in the world. knut the polar bear has died at the young age of 4. how did he go from the top of the world to this tragic end? >>> and bullied no more. this is the video giving hope to underdogs all over the world. this boy body-slams his bully. this morning, he's telling his story. what made him snap? >>> good morning. the u.s. is now involved in its third overseas conflict. this one is called operation odyssey dawn. and throughout the night, we saw images like these. u.s. and british ships and submarines launches missiles at libyan targets to establish a no-fly zone ov
will tell you that the systems used by agencies are fine. the systems that trigger uses are fine and the budget is where the decisions are made anyway. the important data set that is used for oversight and -- by the government and public is not good enough to be used. there are efforts under way to correct the problem. it is a good example about how there it is a lot of excitement around usaspending.gov, but the data has been unusable since the 1970's. the systems we use to track tax expenditures are worse. no one bothers to go back and check whether the estimates issued are correct after the numbers come in to the irs. the two systems used to track our never reconciled with one another. legislative information is still a rite of passage for technologists like myself. at this point, congress is making positive improvements but it is still difficult to work with. we never have access to the source data. we want the files that are the base line ingredients used to draft legislation. we can see them in the pdf's released but it cannot get the actual files. one more step back. i want
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
in the city there. adam, what can you tell us about the nuclear concerns there? >> reporter: yeah, here is at the fish market, the japanese coast, 70 miles away from the first reactor you're talking about, the one that caused the problem the last couple of days before the new reactor up the close from there caused problems and people were talking about the threat at that does exist around this entire region because the fact you have three separate reactors that people are extremely worried about. that evaluation area we're told is about 15 miles in circumference. and up to 200,000 people for sure have already been evacuated and the government says maybe as many as 300,000 will be evacuated and we do know that there are at least 19 scientists on at least one site where they're going through and checking each person being brought out to see what kind of radiation con tamation they've been exposed to. >> yeah, adam, we've been seeing video of some of that radiation testing going on. where do you put more than 200,000 people who were evacuated in the middle of an earthquake zone? >> well, w
. certainly confusing to us over here when we hear it's safe, it's tremendously dangerous, it's safe, it's tremendously dangerous. what's the general feeling on the ground in japan? first of all there remains some degree of disorientation because of the continuing shakes and aftershocks. is there some sense this is getting better or it's still very precarious? >> reporter: very precarious. you know, you are dealing with multiple events here. of course the earthquake, the tsunami, devastation, relief effort, rescue effort, now the nuclear crisis as well. many foreigners just had enough and they've headed for the exit. they've gone to the airports. we've seen long queues there. they don't trust the information they're getting. they don't know whether they're being lied to, they just don't know. that's the question, you just don't know. all day i've tracked this well into the night. sometimes in one hour you can get two or three different briefings from different agencies. sometimes they conflict. sometimes contradict. it's overwhelming, in many respects. but the prime minister's joining --
at student cram.org -- student cam.org. >> joining us on newsmakers on this sunday is greg jaczko, thes chair of the nuclear regulatory commission appointed by president obama.ucle thanks for being with us. >> guest: thanks for having me. >> host: joining us with the questioning is matt wald, new york times, and steve power, both energy reporters. you for being with us. >> thank you. >> host: you're going to get a status report tomorrow on what happened in japan and lessons learned for the u.s., what do you think you're going to s learnsome. >> guest: we're going to have a meeting tomorrow with the full commission at the nrc to get an update on the current status onm the situation in japan. we'll probably have a brief discussion then about what kind of impact radiation can have for the public, and then we'll take a look at some things, kind ofei plan for a plan for how we intend to go forward to do our review and look at what, what kinds of thing we may need tod look at for the u.s. nuclear reactors. >> host: and with the fukushima plant in particular, we're told this morning that two of the
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
chris lawrence with a look at what role the u.s. might play in the no-fly zone. chris, live at the pentagon, what's on deck for the u.s. now that the un has passed this? >> ali, the u.s. air force has a base in italy, the navy has two, and the italians have already okayed the use of their area to launch some of the missions in this know fly zone. there was an aircraft carrier in the mediterranean sea near libya. it left earlier this week and is now out in the arabian sea. without a carrier, planes will have to fly possibly farther, which means they won't be able to spend as much time over libyan aerospace which means you may need more planes to carry out the mission. some of the officials i've spoken with here in the pentagon say don't just think of a no-fly as american fighter pilots flying american jets. there are other ways in which the u.s. can contribute. unmanned drones, for instance. the u.s. also has signal-jamming aircraft that could disrupt colonel gadhafi's ability to communicate with his forces. overall what you'll have to do is have a very clear line of command
over land. >> joining us to examine coverage from hong kong, mike chanoi of the u.s. china institute. and callie crosley, former abc producer who host as a show on wbgh radio. and gary tuchman, national correspondent. gary, i'll start with you. what is it like to drive through that devastated region? how do you deal with the emotional impact of seeing all the rubble and knowing that many, many people have died? >> you know, we went through this a year ago, howie, in haiti. 300,000 people died on january 12, 2010. and the aftershocks for days and weeks afterward. people were so scared to go back into their houses. what's different this time is all of the cameras, video still cameras, taking pictures. so people all over the world can see from so many different angles what happened and also the difference this time, the tsunami. the differences between this and haiti, is the tsunami that has killed most of the people. we're in a town today, town called minamisanriku, japan. 20,000 people lived there before. 9,500 people are missing. the earthquake didn't clear these people. we don't kno
, we are going to look atmore money being spent to put oil in the tank. more money for those of us with home heating oil. >> those of you in the dark blue states are the lucky ones. your gas prices are lowest. new york and out west, prices are fast approaching $4 a gallon. in some places, $4 has been topped. an i reporter sent us this, $4.09 a gallon for gas. it cost $70 to fill up. it will last a week or so. a hike like this in the price of gas is especially tough. what is driving the price of gas higher? the violence in libya. we are hearing of fierce battles in zawiya not far from tripoli. it's a similar story in tripoli. a u.s. official tells cnn the protesters are well armed and could carry on the fight for some time. that means tanks and antiaircraft guns. >> what war? what war? then we will die. >> everybody using guns before the people. anybody makes a small move, they kill them. >> the heavy fighting caused them to flee for the border. it's causing a humanitarian crisis. many are in tent cities in the tunisian border. police arrived yesterday to try to help the situation.
three mile island by his estimates. but as chu tells it, even the u.s. government doesn't really precisely know what's happening there. so keep that in mind as we show you some of these pictures that aired live today. what you're looking at there, it's either smoke, could be steam, it rose today from the plant after officials reported a second atomic reactor may have ruptu ruptured. later on, a japanese spokesman seemed to walk that statement back saying damage to the number 3 reactor appeared not to be that severe. so, going forward, we say who knows. but here's what we know. here's the thing. radiation levels then spiked above the plant which prompted the japanese to ground those helicopters trying to cool the plant. we talked about this yesterday, how those helicopters were going to drop some of the cooler water on the plants. but keep this in mind. they've now got concerns at all six reactors. you see them, 1 through 6, right in front of you, including the two off to the side, numbers 5 and 6. then you have 4, 5 and 6. they were all offline when the tsunami hit last friday, b
martha stewart because martha stewart keeps it -- >> i use twitter to keep in touch. >> countries and cultures are brought together like never before. >> who do hillary clinton, martha stewart, snoop dogg, alissa milano, and i have in common, along with millions of you? >> i'm using twitter to send pictures and thoughts from space. >> tonight, find out what all the twittering's about. if you're not on it, what are you missing? if you are on it, what you may not know that you ought to know. a generation is tweeting and making history. >>> tonight, twitter queens martha stewart and alissa milano on twitter. meet two people that invented twitter. a special live tweeting edition of @pierstonight. [ applause ] ♪ >>> good evening. and welcome to a special edition of "piers morgan tonight" with our live studio audience. with me, two rather special gentlemen who five years ago had the brilliant idea for twitter. co-founders biz stone and jack dorsey. [ applause ] >> 140 million people a day tweet, and in a short while i'm going to bring in some world-class tweeters. martha stewart, ther
useful, he became so rich, he bought his freedom. when we returned about that, we -- when we learned about that, we suddenly learned about a connection to marina's family. >> so i had always known about my family's connection to sugar because my great grandparents traveled from india across to guyana which is in south america, but it's considered part of the caribbean, and they came to cut, to work on sugar plantations. so part of what fascinated us was what is this substance where someone in be his family -- in his family all the way in russia, a serf, and someone in my family looking to get a better life over here in india and then over to the caribbean, what is this substance that could effect people from such different parking lots of the world? -- parts of the world? >> and before we trace that out, we want to ask you a question. how many of you think you might have sugar somewhere in your family background? so that's one, two, three -- oh, man, yes! yes! >> all right. what i'm going to do, i just want to hear from a couple of you where your family might have been from, okay? >>
with cbs news correspondent harry smith who joins us on the phone this morning from sendai. harry, you need to stay inside at this point? >> reporter: well, a little bit vague, to be perfectly honest. they prefer we say inside. we were outside all day and plenty of rescue operations and normal citizens going about their business today in sendai. we are several hours north of fukushima where the crippled nuclear reactor is. it looks like the japanese are losing their battle to get control of that place, as we say, fukushima, which is a couple of hours south of where we are, well, there was even more bad news today. fears of a nuclear disaster grew today following a third explosion and fire, the largest so far at the crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. >> translator: the reading of the level seems very high. and there is still a very high risk of further radioactive material. >> reporter: workers were struggling to prevent meltdowns of three reactors at the site when the fourth reactor blew. the fire that followed is believed to be the source of the elevated radiation. some 70,000
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